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Writing Instruction

The following books are recommended for the implementation of the writing workshop approach and the proficient learner strategies. They are all highly rated by teachers.

List of Books

  • The Next-Step Guide to Enhancing Writing Instruction Rubrics and Resources for Self-Evaluation and Goal Setting, For Literacy Coaches, Principals, and Teacher Study Groups, K-6 by: Bonnie Campbell Hill & Carrie Ekey Grade Level: K-6   Heinemann ...
    Posted Jul 1, 2012, 1:59 AM by Paul Ketko
  • Nonfiction Mentor Texts: Teaching informational writing through children's literature by: Lynne R. Dorfman & Rose Cappelli  Grade Level: K-8  Stenhouse Publishers  In their first book, Mentor Texts, Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli demonstrated how teachers can use children's ...
    Posted Jul 1, 2012, 2:00 AM by Paul Ketko
  • Mentor Texts: Teaching writing through children's literature by: Lynne R. Dorfman & Rose Cappelli   Grade Level: K-6   Stenhouse Publishers   How do children's book authors create the wonder that we feel when reading our favorite books? What ...
    Posted Jul 1, 2012, 2:08 AM by Paul Ketko
  • One to One: The art of conferring with young writers by: Lucy Calkins,  Amanda Hartman, Zoe Ryder White    Grade Level: K-3  Heinemann In an effective writing workshop, young children grow in leaps and bounds, and within just a ...
    Posted Dec 28, 2010, 10:49 PM by Paul Ketko
  • How's It Going?: A practical guide to conferring with student writers by: Carl Anderson Grade Level: Gr. 2-8  Heinemann   This is by far the best writing on the conference I have read. It is a book that is far ...
    Posted Dec 28, 2010, 10:50 PM by Paul Ketko
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The Next-Step Guide to Enhancing Writing Instruction

posted Jan 6, 2011, 11:45 PM by Paul Ketko   [ updated Jul 1, 2012, 1:59 AM ]

Rubrics and Resources for Self-Evaluation and Goal Setting, For Literacy Coaches, Principals, and Teacher Study Groups, K-6

by: Bonnie Campbell Hill & Carrie Ekey

Grade Level: K-6  

Bonnie Campbell Hill and Carrie Ekey affirm the good work you’re doing, and inspire you to read further and incorporate new ideas so that you can teach writing even more effectively, intentionally, responsively, and joyfully with cutting-edge ideas in writing instruction.

Two detailed rubrics help you create classrooms in which young writers can flourish:

  •  A rubric for leaders helps principals, staff developers, and literacy coaches ascertain what works at your school and what’s next so that together you can set schoolwide goals and provide time, resources, and professional development opportunities for writing instruction and word study.
  •  A rubric for teachers helps them assess their strengths and areas for growth in teaching writing and word study.

Each chapter walks through one strand of the rubrics and provides opportunities to develop common language and practices for writing instruction and word study:

  • ponder boxes guide book study, stimulate discussion, and suggest next steps
  • book lists point the way to further professional learning
  • classroom photographs and vignettes from exemplary classrooms burst with practical examples and ready-to-use ideas

  • Click here to order: Heinemann
    ISBN 978-0-325-03045-6 / 0-325-03045-6 / 2010 / 256pp / Paperback

Nonfiction Mentor Texts: Teaching informational writing through children's literature

posted Jan 4, 2011, 11:40 PM by Paul Ketko   [ updated Jul 1, 2012, 2:00 AM ]

by: Lynne R. Dorfman & Rose Cappelli  

Grade Level: K-8  

In their first book, Mentor Texts, Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli demonstrated how teachers can use children's literature to guide and inspire student writers of narrative fiction and poetry. Now, they have turned their focus to nonfiction, identifying a wide range of mentor texts and showing how these models illustrate the key features of good writing.

Lynne and Rose guide teachers through a variety of projects, samples, and classroom anecdotes that demonstrate how teachers can help students become more effective writers of good nonfiction. The Your Turn lessons at the end of each chapter use the gradual release of responsibility model to guide and empower student writers. Teachers will find especially helpful the information on how to select appropriate mentor texts from among the sometimes overwhelming offerings of children's literature. Each Your Turn lesson encourages reflection and motivates students to think about what they've learned, the purpose of learning and practicing a skill or strategy, and how they might use this technique in the future. Additionally, An Author's Voice provides encouragement and advice from published authors of children's nonfiction.

One of the most valuable features of Nonfiction Mentor Texts is the treasure chest of books organized according to chapter. This list includes every title mentioned in the book, as well as a host of other titles that teachers can use to help students learn about quality nonfiction writing—building content, organizing text, developing voice, enhancing style, using punctuation effectively—and from which students can draw topic ideas. Lynne and Rose have either read or used all of the featured books in their classrooms and have selected titles that meet the needs of students at varying levels. Teachers will be able to find the just-right book for each student.


Click here to order:
 Stenhouse  

ISBN: 978-157110-496-0 / Item No.: WEB-0496 / 2009 / 304 pp / Paperback

Preview the book online!Preview the book online!

Mentor Texts: Teaching writing through children's literature

posted Jan 4, 2011, 11:20 PM by Paul Ketko   [ updated Jul 1, 2012, 2:08 AM ]

by: Lynne R. Dorfman & Rose Cappelli  

Grade Level: K-6  

  • How do children's book authors create the wonder that we feel when reading our favorite books? What can students and teachers learn from these authors and books if we let them serve as writing mentors? In Mentor Texts, Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli show teachers how to help students become confident, accomplished writers, using literature as their foundation.
  • The book is organized around the characteristics of good writing—focus, content, organization, style, and conventions—and includes:

  • mentor texts that can be used to scaffold student work;
  • student writing examples to demonstrate how students take risks as writers;
  • teacher writing examples to show the power of teacher as writer;
  • a comprehensive annotated list of children's literature that includes specific suggestions for teaching points;
  • “Your Turn” lessons at the end of each chapter that show how to put the ideas into practice.
  • Rose and Lynne write in a friendly and conversational style, employing numerous anecdotes to help teachers visualize the process, and offer strategies that can be immediately implemented in the classroom. Each “Your Turn” lesson is built around the gradual release of responsibility model, offering suggestions for demonstrations and shared or guided writing. Reflection is emphasized as a necessary component to understanding why mentor authors chose certain strategies, literary devices, sentence structures, and words.
  • This practical resource demonstrates the power of learning to read like writers. It shows teachers and students how to discover the ways that authors make writing come alive, and how to use that knowledge to inspire and improve their own writing.


Click here to order:
 Stenhouse  

ISBN: 978-157110-433-5 / Item No.: WEB-0433 / 2007 / 328 pp / Paperback

Preview the book online!Preview the book online!

One to One: The art of conferring with young writers

posted Dec 28, 2010, 9:15 PM by Paul Ketko   [ updated Dec 28, 2010, 10:49 PM ]

Grade Level: K-3  Heinemann

In an effective writing workshop, young children grow in leaps and bounds, and within just a few months, the changes in their written products can dazzle you. And after 30 years of studying her students' growth in the writing workshop, Lucy Calkins knows one of the most powerful ways to support good writers: clear, purposeful writing conferences.

In One to One Calkins and her colleagues Amanda Hartman and Zoë White show you the practices and principles that create effective conferences. They dispel the myth that master teachers have a magic touch and show you that effective teachers do not reinvent the conference with each student, but rather use predictable, principled interactions that follow a few simple frameworks. In One to One, you will learn:

  • repeatable conferring frameworks that are the foundation of effective conferring
  • specific teaching methods that you can match to your students' needs
  • strategies for tailoring conferences to English language learners
  • ways to use conferring across the content areas
  • on-the-run record-keeping systems that are efficient, powerful teaching tools.
Good conferring, like good teaching, relies on your ability to communicate effectively with children, and the skills you develop as you learn to confer will improve your teaching abilities in all areas, including developing curriculum, leading strong minilessons, and untangling the classroom chaos that can derail a smoothly running workshop. Read One to One to improve your conferences and your teaching. But most important, read it to improve your students' writing every day.

Click here to order:
 
Heinemann
ISBN 978-0-325-00788-5 / 0-325-00788-8 / 2005 / 232pp / Paperback


Tags: literacy-t, workshop-t, writing-t, writing units-t, conferring writing-t


How's It Going?: A practical guide to conferring with student writers

posted Dec 28, 2010, 9:08 PM by Paul Ketko   [ updated Dec 28, 2010, 10:50 PM ]

by: Carl Anderson

Grade Level: Gr. 2-8  Heinemann  

    This is by far the best writing on the conference I have read. It is a book that is far superior to the other texts-including my own.
    —Donald M. Murray

Our one-on-one talks with students during writing workshop offer us perfect opportunities to zero in on what each student needs as a writer. As Lead Staff Developer for the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, Carl Anderson has provided hundreds of teachers with the information and confidence they need to make these complex conferences an effective part of classroom practice. Finally, in How’s It Going?, Anderson shares his expertise with the rest of us.

For Anderson, the key to a powerful writing conference lies in understanding that it is a conversation with a clear purpose and a predictable structure. This is the best lens through which to view the task of talking about writing. To that end, Anderson shows how we can take what we already know about having effective conversations and use that knowledge. Sample transcripts of conferences with elementary and middle school students in both urban and suburban settings walk us through the process step by step, providing new insight into how ambitious conferences unfold.

Above all, How’s It Going? is a practical book. Written in a conversational style, it’s filled with lots of useful advice, including an in-depth discussion of the teacher’s role in conferences, strategies for teaching students to take an active role, ways to weave in literature, minilessons, classroom management strategies, and responses to the most frequently asked questions about conferring. Along the way, readers will learn new ways of thinking, develop effective techniques, and perfect straightforward strategies. At the same time, they’ll grasp the art and logic of conferring, and with this learning in mind, discover for themselves how to confer well.


Click here to order:
 Heinemann 

I
SBN: 978-0-325-00224-8 / 0-325-00224-X / 2000 / 224pp / Paperback

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Tags: literacy-t, workshop-t, writing-t, writing units-t, conferring writng-t

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